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Posts Tagged ‘Macro’

In testimony before Congress’s Joint Economic Committee today, Treasury Assistant Secretary Alan Krueger provides further evidence that small employers have been particularly hard hit by the financial crisis and economic downturn.

Using research data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey data (known as the JOLTS data), Alan found that the pace of job openings has been rebounding at large employers (in green), but remains low at smaller employers (red and blue):

He also found important differences in the way that large and small employers reacted to the worsening of the financial crisis in September 2008:

[S]mall establishments responded by quickly laying off a large number of workers.  Mid-size establishments … and large establishments … responded by sharply cutting back on hiring in the months immediately after the crisis, and while they also increased layoffs, the increase was not as large as that seen by the small establishments. [See his testimony for the corresponding charts.]

His bottom line:

[T]he improvement in the labor market seen to date has been unevenly distributed across establishments of different sizes.  On the positive side, labor demand has generally trended up at large private sector establishments since reaching a trough in February 2008. Moreover, large establishments have apparently increased employment in five of the six months since September 2009–a possible early sign of durable job growth.  At the lower end of the size distribution, however, labor demand by small establishments has continued to be weak, with notably low rates of new hires.

P.S. For an earlier discussion of the JOLTS data, see this post.

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Good news: The Recovery.gov website now includes information about the tax components of the stimulus, not just the spending components:

arrataxrelief

According to the chart, an estimated $62.5 billion made its way out the door in tax reductions through the end of August. The corresponding spending data indicate that $88.8 billion in federal spending made its way out the door by August 28.

Putting these together, you get an estimated $151.3 billion in combined tax reductions and spending increases through the end of August.

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